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Entertainment

October 16, 2017

Who did “It” better: the book or the movie?

klownz
The new film adaptation of Stephen King’s popular horror novel, “It,” has drawn in large audiences and has received positive feedback since its release, on Sept. 8. Read with caution! SPOILERS AHEAD!
The Loser’s Club
The story revolves around the town Derry and seven friends, Bill, Ben, Beverly, Richie, Eddie, Mike and Stan, who are brought together after they were casted out by other kids in school. They satirically name their group the The Loser’s Club. While King offers detailed backstories for each character, the movie gave just enough background to add to the plot.
Richie, a fan favorite and wild jokester, is even more savage in the book since all of his jokes are racist and stereotypical. During the 50’s, the story’s time period, this was acceptable, but the movie takes place in the 80’s, so racism is a no no.
After individually haunting the kids, the monster clown reveals himself to the group by threatening them from Mike’s photo album. Filmmakers traumatized audiences by modernizing this scene when a massive killer clown hopped out of a projector screen.  After their encounters, the group creatively names the monster ‘It.’
The film portrays these encounters, more or less, accurately, but doesn’t include all incidents since the novel has countless. However, the film leaves minor acknowledgments to the missing encounters, which you’ll understand if you read the bible-sized book.
Also, the movie never covers the significance of Bill’s bike, Silver. Readers fall in love with the bike since it is included during many of the scenes and is the purpose for Bill’s escape on many occasions.
Once devising a plan and learning It lives in the sewers, they head to the source of all sewer lines, where they defeat It. In the novel, a significant moment occurs proceeding It’s defeat when the kids get lost trying to navigate their way out the sewer. To put it plainly, Beverly consecutively has sex with each boy. Despite having plot significance, no filmmaker will ever dare include this scene because of the inevitable scrutinization.
Pennywise, the Dancing Clown
Pennywise, the creepy killer clown, is everyone’s most and least favorite character. If you read the book you’d know Pennywise is some weird spirit that crashed onto Earth long ago from a dimension surrounding our universe. King doesn’t write a detailed explanation
of his origin since
it’s really complicated. However, King describes his true form as eerie orange lights called deadlights, but the film only reveals them when Beverly is put in a
trance.
So Pennywise is actually a type of super villain when you think about his powers. He’s able to hypnotize, transform, read minds, and be invisible. Even with all this, he chooses to be a clown when he’s the embodiment a greatest fear.. According to the book, Pennywise prefers kids because they are easily scared and the fear makes their meat taste better.. Still, he murders adults, but the movie focuses on just children.
The movie claims that It returns to Derry every 27 years, but in the novel, It is awoken when a brutal act is committed and goes back into hibernation only when an equally vicious incident occurs. In the film, It is defeated when the Loser’s Club shows no fear and fights It toe to toe, while in the book It is only weakened when struck with a silver chunk and defeated in the Ritual of Chud, a battle of wills. Don’t ask, just read the book.
It: Part 2
At the end of the movie, filmmakers confirmed a sequel which will probably be “It: But the kids are adults.” The only thing I’m really looking forward to in the sequel is how Pennywise’s true form will be revealed and if filmmakers will dare to include the uncomfortable sex scene.


About the Author

Chris Klementich





 
 

 
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